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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on How the brain controls behavior: Using flies to study motor control at the circuit level – 9/25/2017

How the brain controls behavior: Using flies to study motor control at the circuit level – 9/25/2017

Claire McKellar Janelia Research Campus/HHMI Abstract: Investigating how the nervous system controls complex behaviors in simple animals could reveal mechanisms that are fundamental to behavior across species. Cutting-edge genetic tools in flies allow control over multiple neuron types, giving access to a circuit-level view of behavioral control. I am addressing two important questions about behavioral […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Seeing What Others Cannot See – 10/2/2017

Seeing What Others Cannot See – 10/2/2017

Thomas G. West Author of Thinking Like Einstein and In the Mind’s Eye Krasnow Institute Advisory Board Member Abstract: For over 25 years, Thomas West has been a leading advocate for the importance of visual thinking, visual technologies and the creative potential of individuals with dyslexia and other learning differences. In this new book, Seeing […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Modeling and quantification of astrocyte activity from calcium imaging data – 10/16/2017

Modeling and quantification of astrocyte activity from calcium imaging data – 10/16/2017

Guoqiang Yu Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that astrocytes exert proactive regulatory effects on brain information processing and that they are deeply involved in normal brain development and disease pathology. Recording astrocyte activity is now technically feasible, due to recent advances in modern microscopy and ultrasensitive cell-type specific genetically […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Cellular and molecular aberrations in Neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism, intellectual disability and related disorders – 10/30/2017

Cellular and molecular aberrations in Neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism, intellectual disability and related disorders – 10/30/2017

Jyothi Arikkath University of Nebraska Medical Center Abstract: Autism spectrum disorders represent a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction, communication skills and repetitive behavior. These disorders are often co-morbid with other disorders including intellectual disability. A major challenge in autism and related disorders has been to define cellular and molecular […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on The Challenge of Modeling Cognition for Computational Social Science – 3/20/2017

The Challenge of Modeling Cognition for Computational Social Science – 3/20/2017

Bill Kennedy Assistant Professor Center for Social Complexity Computational Social Science Program Abstract: Computational Social Science (CSS) uses models of cognition, mostly human cognition. Zero intelligence agents may be useful for some economic experiments and agents with preferences about their neighbors and moving randomly may demonstrate the emergence of segregation, but better models of individual’s […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on A novel role for Drosophila Amyloid Precursor Protein in regulating axonal retrograde trafficking of selective cargoes – 3/6/2017

A novel role for Drosophila Amyloid Precursor Protein in regulating axonal retrograde trafficking of selective cargoes – 3/6/2017

Tanja Godenschwege Florida Atlantic University Department of Biological Sciences Abstract: One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the presence of β-amyloid plaques that result from abnormal processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). Although a great deal is known about AD pathology, relatively little is known about the normal biological function of […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Of Form and Function: Stochastic Optimization Elucidates Role of Dynamics in Proteinopathies – 2/27/2017

Of Form and Function: Stochastic Optimization Elucidates Role of Dynamics in Proteinopathies – 2/27/2017

Amarda Shehu Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science George Mason University Abstract: All processes that maintain and replicate a living cell involve moving biomolecules. The energy landscape underscores the inherent nature of biomolecules as dynamic systems interconverting between structures with varying energies. Biomolecular structural transitions regulate diverse processes, such as allosteric signaling and catalysis, and […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Mason – 2/13/2017

Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Mason – 2/13/2017

Hina Mehta (Associate Director, Office of Technology Transfer) Sean Mallon (Associate Vice President, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Office of the Provost) Bob Smith (Director, Mason Small Business Development Center, Mason Enterprise Center) Abstract: Ever thought about starting a company? Have an idea for a startup, but not sure where to start? Working on breakthrough research but […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Association of a functional polymorphism of the human CHRFAM7A gene with inflammatory response mediators after spinal cord injury – 1/23/2017

Association of a functional polymorphism of the human CHRFAM7A gene with inflammatory response mediators after spinal cord injury – 1/23/2017

Robert Lipsky, Ph.D. Director, Translational Research Inova Neurosciences Institute Inova Health System Abstract: A complex system of activated immune cells and cytokines contributes to the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury (SCI).  Specific receptors are the targets of cytokines in these cells. It is known that the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, α7nAChR, plays a […]

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Monday Seminar, Past Monday Seminars | Comments Off on Predicting How Genetic Mutations Can Cause Disease: Cardiac Arrhythmia as an Example – 12/5/2016

Predicting How Genetic Mutations Can Cause Disease: Cardiac Arrhythmia as an Example – 12/5/2016

Saleet Jafri Krasnow Institute George Mason University Abstract: Understanding how genetic variation manifests itself as phenotype is major unanswered question in biology.  We explore this issue in the context of heart disease.  A certain class of cardiac arrhythmia results from defects in intracellular calcium dynamics.  Of these many can be attributed to genetic mutations in […]

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